Letter: Take into account what your student wants

Editor:

I am a reader of Wellington Weekly, and I have been reading the letters about Wellington High School. My name is Zachary Ogg, and I am a junior at Poudre High School. I know all of the adults are in favor of a Wellington High School, but I am not. I do not agree with the past two letters to the editor involving this topic because:

​1) Unlike in the most recent letter, most Wellington kids are involved in extra-curricular activities. It doesn’t matter what they are. It can be choir, sports, band, orchestra, debate team or even an athletic trainer’s assistant. Any of these activities are considered extra-curricular, and I know that about 1/3 of these activities are taken up by Wellington kids.

​2) About the students not being close at Poudre High School. All of the Wellington kids I went to school with in middle school are all still my friends (like it said in the most recent letter, Wellington kids are close). But ALL of us have new friends at Poudre. At Poudre, we are proud to be diverse, as well as welcoming and friendly to all of the new people at our school.

3) Although Poudre is getting crowded, I think it adds to the fun of high school. Because of the school being crowded, we (the students) get to interact with more people in the hallways on the way to classes. You see everyone. This helps more people be included because everyone is saying, “hi,” to each other. There are just a bunch of happy high school students interacting with each other.

​4) Wellington High School (although it sounds great) would be difficult for most of the Wellington students. We are all used to the daily routine and seeing each other at school, but what if you build it? A lot of the students won’t want to switch schools, and the ones who do will likely get separated from their friends that decide to stay at Poudre. That will split up the people who have been friends since middle or elementary school, and would you want to do that?

I’m not writing this letter to be argumentative, but out of concern. What I want you, the reader, to do is ask your student what they want. Then make a decision as a family of what you think is best and really take account of what YOUR student wants.

Zachary Ogg
Wellington

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