State Historical Fund Grants Awarded to Outstanding Archaeological and Historic Resources Across Colorado

The History Colorado State Historical Fund awarded 14 grants for the fall 2019 “mini” grant round (grants up to $35,000). The State Historical Fund grants are awarded and matched by applicants to fund archaeology and historic preservation projects that tell the story of Colorado’s history and generate meaningful economic activity, especially in rural communities.

Philip Clapham
Preservation Communications Manager
303-866-2049 / 303-681-5823 (cell) | philip.clapham@state.co.us

The History Colorado State Historical Fund awarded 14 grants for the fall 2019 “mini” grant round (grants up to $35,000). The State Historical Fund grants are awarded and matched by applicants to fund archaeology and historic preservation projects that tell the story of Colorado’s history and generate meaningful economic activity, especially in rural communities.

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The multi-partner projects advance statewide efforts to identify and preserve areas important in the history, architecture, archaeology, and culture of Colorado. Here are some grant highlights:

  • Conservation Legacy’s 2020-2021 Colorado Preserve America Youth Summit – The upcoming Preserve America Youth Summits will feature two hands-on, field-school summer programs that engage students and teachers to advance heritage education and historic preservation into the 21st century and beyond. The summits orient regional histories and preservation issues within contemporary, intersectional issues to empower young people as leaders of tomorrow.

  • University of Northern Colorado’s Archaeological Investigation of Dearfield – The Dearfield townsite was home to blacksmith, auto-mechanic, and fiddle player, Squire Brockman. Surface surveys and test excavations of his home and the town blacksmith’s shop, used by him from 1919 until his passing in 1951, are the project’s central focus. Professor Robert Brunswig will lead research into Brockman’s life story to better understanding his role in the growth, development, and demise of Colorado’s best-known African-American pioneer farm colony.

  • Colorado School for the Deaf and Blind – Serving the needs of a student population with unique disabilities and capabilities since 1874, the school’s administration building is truly the heart of the campus. Parents and youth from across Colorado visit the Colorado Springs campus, not only as students but also as participants in educational camps throughout the summer. The 291,000 square-foot campus has undergone numerous phases of restoration, and will now have the capacity to ensure that the administration building’s historic elements receive proper preservation and treatment.

  • Romley Terminal in Historic St. Elmo and Chalk Creek Canyon – The Romley Tramway Terminal was a critical node in the ore transfer and milling system of the Mary Murphy Mine, a major operation in the Chalk Creek Mining District. Operating between 1891 and 1912, this mining tramway terminal is the last of its kind in all of the Rocky Mountains, and an irreplaceable part of Colorado’s mining history. This grant will facilitate its exterior rehabilitation.

View the full list of awardees here.

The State Historical Fund provides funding for a wide variety of projects including restoration and rehabilitation of historic buildings, architectural assessments, archaeological excavations, designation and interpretation of historic places, preservation planning studies and education and training programs.

The next general grant round (for amounts greater than $35,000) will open for applications on February 1, 2020. Please visit www.historycolorado.org/state-historical-fund or call (303) 866-2825 for more information.

The State Historical Fund was created by the 1990 constitutional amendment allowing limited gaming in the towns of Black Hawk, Central City, and Cripple Creek. The amendment directs that a portion of the gaming tax revenue be used for historic preservation throughout the state.

History Colorado’s mission is to create a better future for Colorado by inspiring wonder in our past. We serve as the state’s memory, preserving the places, stories and material culture of Colorado through the History Colorado Center and statewide Community Museums, educational programs, historic preservation grants, a research library, collections and outreach to Colorado communities. Visit HistoryColorado.org, or call 303-HISTORY, for more information.

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