Group Honors Memory of Eros With Donation to ‘Animal Debt Project’

Kristi Cannon presents a check for $1500.00 to Ashley Raymer, of the Animal Debt Project (Photo by Matt Dierlam)

Kristi Cannon didn’t know Kera Randles’ family dog, Eros. She wished she had – and that a lot of other people had the opportunity, too.

The fact that Randles’ life was turned upside down by a senseless attack that left Eros dead was enough to spur the Wellington woman to let the Wyoming visitor know that northern Coloradoans care. They care about her, and Eros.

Cannon put her heart where her wallet is recently when she celebrated the second anniversary of Eros’ death by donating funds raised through the “Justice for Eros” campaign to the Animal Debt Project, a local nonprofit animal shelter that offers long-term care for displaced pets. The “Justice for Eros” fundraiser generated $1,500 for the Wellington-based shelter.

“When the funds were raised two years ago, a commitment was made that if no one was found guilty and convicted of this crime, the money would be donated to a local no-kill animal shelter,” said Cannon.

“On the 2-year anniversary of Eros’ death, we are proud to announce that the team presented a check for $1,500 to Ashley Raymer of the Animal Debt Project.”

Randles, along with Eros, traveled more than 300 miles from her home in Wyoming to visit a friend in northern Colorado. Less than 24 hours after arriving, Eros managed to get out of her friend’s yard. He was found later, having been killed and dragged over a railroad track.

“This story caused a great deal of concern by a deeply caring community that takes pride in caring about all its citizens and pets,” Cannon said. “It resulted in the community really pulling together to help solve this and bring justice to Eros.”

Although the story is disturbing, some positives came from the incident. After the attack, a team came together to try and track down the dog’s killer. The team raised $1,500 to be used as a reward for information on the case through a Go Fund Me account. Despite the publicity the incident received, the Larimer County Sheriff’s Department was unable to make an arrest in the case despite having received several tips.

“A couple of leads were produced but as often happens with animal killings, nothing definitive came through in this case,” said Cannon. “When the funds were raised, a commitment was made that if no one was found guilty and convicted of this crime, the money would be donated to a local shelter.”

Cannon said the donation to Animal Debt Project was a perfect way to remember Eros.

“They are a 501c (3) nonprofit, no-kill shelter,” she said. “And, they are committed to paying the debt to animals in our local community. They work alongside other rescuers across the country to save animals  from abuse, neglect, and kill shelters.”

Cannon said there was even some good news for Randles. On the one-year anniversary of Eros’ death, Randles was able to adopt an abandoned puppy from the Animal Debt Project.

Kristi Cannon, the organizer of the fundraiser for Eros’s reward fund, said her group is still determined to find justice for Eros.

“We are releasing these funds in memory of Eros and to help support the Wellington community even after the tragedy of this crime,” she said. “I will personally vouch that if another lead comes forward and a person is found guilty and convicted of this heinous crime, I will fund the same reward money to the person that provided the important tip out of my own pocket.”

Cannon also offered a special thanks to the team that worked to generate leads, media coverage and cared about what happened to this pet and to the local community. She said Ashley Raymer, Deanna Kleszcynski, Greg Nieto, Julie Weingand, Kari Hagerman, Randles, Krista McCartney, and Tara Bostick were paramount in the success of the group.

Individuals that would like to support by volunteering, fostering, adopting, or financially supporting ‘The Animal Debt Project’ please reach out to them at: Adp.ash83@gmail.com or call (970) 786-5358.

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