American Red Cross of Colorado & Wyoming Volunteers Provide Comfort to People After Local Emergencies Like Home Fires and Wildfires Across the West

Since the beginning of the year, the American Red Cross of Colorado and Wyoming has continued responding to emergencies every day across the country and in our communities. In addition to the larger-scale disasters and deployments to help out other states, Red Cross volunteers and employees were on hand to help people after daily emergencies like home fires that cause incredible hardship for the impacted individuals and families. Disaster workers were there with relief and comfort for people facing their darkest hours. They delivered food, shelter, relief and cleanup supplies, basic health services — such as help replacing prescription medications and eyeglasses — and emotional support. In August, the Red Cross of Colorado and Wyoming provided support and care to 175 people. Out of the 41 calls in August, most of the calls were for home fires.

August 2022 Local Disaster Responses

  • Mile High Chapter (MHC) responded to 21 calls for service and helped 117 people. The MHC response area includes ten counties in the Denver Metro area.
  • Southeastern Colorado Chapter (SECO) responded to four calls for service and helped ten people. The SECO response area includes 16 counties.
  • Northern Colorado Chapter (NOCO) responded to four calls for service and helped 16 people. The NOCO response area includes 11 counties.
  • Western Colorado Chapter (WECO) responded to three calls for service and helped six people. The WECO response area covers 27 counties, serving all Western Colorado and the San Luis Valley.
  • Wyoming Chapter (WYO) responded to nine calls for assistance and provided care to 26 people. The WYO response area covers 21 counties in the state of Wyoming.

Local Volunteers Serving Around the Country

Western Wildfires

Since April, the Red Cross has opened nine disaster relief operations as wildfires raged across California, New Mexico, Alaska, Arizona, Oregon and Washington. In response to the wildfires, some 700 trained Red Cross responders have worked with partners to provide more than 14,300 overnight stays in emergency shelters, over 26,000 meals and snacks and nearly 20,000 relief supplies. This wildfire season has already seen about 202,000 acres burned across California alone. Fires have consumed more than 6.2 million acres across the country so far this year.

Kentucky Floods

Some 400 trained Red Cross disaster workers were called into action as flash floods ripped through Eastern Kentucky in last July, five of which we local volunteers from the Colorado and Wyoming region. Volunteers continue to work around the clock to provide a safe place to stay, food to eat, critical relief supplies and emotional support for those affected by this tragedy. Preliminary damage assessments indicate that nearly 1,400 homes were either destroyed or suffered major damage.

September is National Preparedness Month

People everywhere are feeling the impacts of climate change with more frequent and intense weather events threatening our communities. September is National Preparedness Month and the American Red Cross urges everyone to get ready for these emergencies now. Just last year, more than 40% of Americans — some 130 million people — were living in a county struck by a climate-related disaster, according to analysis from the Washington Post. Disasters can happen anywhere, anytime. You can be ready by visiting redcross.org/prepare.

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information and photos, please visit https://cowyredcrossblog.org/ or visit us on Twitter at @cowyredcross.

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